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Full text of "Crippled Children's Hospital"

AG4 
1920 




Scottish Rite 
Hospital for 

Crippled Children 




ATLANTA 
GEORGIA 



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Crippled Children s 
Hospital 




Scottish Rite 
Hospital for Crippled Children 

ATLANTA, GA. 




fcfy Tmnefer 

*UN 2b 



FOREWORD 



53? J. C. GREENFIELD, 33rd Hon. 



ND BEHOLD, I show you a Mystery!" In this utter- 
ance the inspired Apostle begins his answer to the 
great question of all time, the enigma of the ages, "If 
^E^'^T^l a man die shall he live again?" Paul was explaining 
Resurrection and its relation to Immortality, and two thousand 
years of comment and criticism have not improved his exegesis. 

But there are mysteries on every side of us almost as profound 
as that of death. Come with me a few miles from Atlanta to the 
Scottish Rite Hospital for Crippled Children and I will show you 
many mysteries. One of these mysteries is also a Resurrection. 
A Resurrection from a living death to a life of joy and usefulness; 
from years of helplessness and possible pauperism to the certainty 
of health and self-sustaining citizenship. 

I will show you the mysteries of a horribly mis-shapen pair 
of feet changing under the deft hands of a skilled surgeon to a set 
of normal extremities, and a pitiful, hobbling, child converted to a 
romping, racing youngster fairly exuding the joy of living. 

I will show you the mystery of a distorted back, emerging 
gradually but surely from mis-shape to true-shape ; from crooked- 
ness to straightness ; from a curve to a line. 

I will show you the mystery of a human being; the home of 
an immortal soul; supposed to be created in the image of God 
Himself ; coming to the Hospital walking like a quadruped, and a 
few months later standing upright, looking his fellows in the face, 
and out of the fullness of a grateful heart saying, "This is the 
first time I ever stood erect." 

I will show you a mystery of a child that never walked at all. 
Stricken shortly after birth by that dread disease, Infantile 
Paralysis, it came to us apparently a hopeless case, and yet, after 
treatment, that same child left the Hospital hand in hand with 
her mother, the only indication of her trouble being a slightly 
perceptible limp, which will disappear with growth and the ap- 
proach of maturity. 

But I can show you a still greater mystery. I can show you a 
charity, which, although called a Hospital, has none of the repel- 



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lant features usually associated with such an institution. I will 
show you buildings filled with half a hundred children; their ages 
running from one to sixteen years; afflicted with every trouble 
known to orthopedic surgery; some stretched on iron frames; 
others bound with strange devices; still others wrapped in plaster 
casts ; yet all happy, merry and light-hearted. The youngest seems 
to have caught the atmosphere of the place, and even to realize 
that it was begun, and is being fostered for the cure of their own 
particular case. 

The parents, too, have grasped this fundamental idea. I have 
seen a mother steal quietly up to where her dear one lay, peer 
through the screen at him and then hurry away with tear-stained 
cheek, fearful lest the sight of her would make him, for the mo- 
ment, unhappy. I have seen a father, after a week of hard toil, 
sit by the bedside of his little girl for hours to keep her company. 
I have seen another mother with the finger of the dread angel 
already pointed at her, kiss her son good-bye, and without a hint 
of the future walk away from him forever, lest the knowledge 
would, even for a moment, retard his recovery. 

But I will show you a still greater mystery. Look at the 
pictures reproduced in this booklet. They are not specially se- 
lected, but are taken at random from the many cases that come 
to us. Observe the improvement in the facial expression of many 
of them. They show, in many cases, a progress from despair to 
hope, from sorrow to joy, from animalism and degeneracy to 
normal boyhood and girlhood. Surely this is a true Resurrection 
from things material to things spiritual. 

A certain Dr. Forrester, in one of his articles, uses this preg- 
nant sentence, "The best alms is that which makes alms unneces- 
sary." This has been the guiding thought of the men who made 
this institution possible, and are directing its destinies. Construc- 
tive charity has been their aim ; to enable others to help themselves 
has been their ultimate purpose. And when, as its material to 
work upon, it selects helpless childhood of indigent parentage, who 
are utterly without hope of receiving this service necessary for 
their case, they have reached the highest expression of a true 
charity. And surely this expression has been attained in the 
Scottish Rite Hospital for Crippled Children. 

Have I not shown you many mysteries? 



Our Field 



Any crippled child that can be bene- 
fited, and that can fulfill the pre-requi- 
sites for admission. 

Our Requirements 

Possibility of improvement. 
Normal mentality. 

Inability to pay for the services rendered. 

Our N on-Essentials 

Religious creed. 
Fraternal Affiliations. 
Social standing. 
Financial connections. 

Our Object 

To benefit helpless humanity. 
To prevent possible pauperism. 
To turn wealth consumers into wealth 
producers. 

To exemplify Masonic principles. 



HISTORY 

The Scottish Rite Hospital for Crippled Children is the out- 
come of a desire on the part of the brethren of Atlanta to put into 
practice some of the principles for which Masonry stands, and of 
a determination, on their part, to present to the world a concrete 
example of true charity and one on which the shadow of com- 
mercialism would never fall. To this end one of the fundamental 
rules adopted at the outset was that there should never be a pay 
patient admitted within its walls. This rule cannot be stressed 
too much ; it places the Hospital on a pedestal above every other 
institution of its kind ; it lifts it above the level of selfish interest ; 
it is a recognition of the fact that we owe something to those to 
whom the good things of life do not come; and that every child, 
no matter how handicapped, is entitled to a fair start in the battle 
of life. 

The Institution was opened for patients on September 1st, 
1915, in two small cottages which had been converted as much as 
possible to suit Hospital needs. They were located on Hill Street, 
at the junction of the South Decatur car line and East Lake Drive, 
and the total capacity was twenty beds. 

When it is remembered that the last census showed that there 
are nearly two hundred thousand crippled children in the United 
States under fourteen years of age, and that Georgia alone has 
over four thousand, it will be seen that this was a very small factor 
in relieving these various forms of disease. 

The waiting list grew until finally the pressure upon the In- 
stitution became so great that plans were begun for the erection 
of new buildings with a much greater capacity, and better suited 
for the purposes for which they were to be used. 

Under the old, cramped arrangement, when an operation was 
necessary the patient would have to be brought into the city a 
couple of days beforehand, placed in one of the local Hospitals, 
operated on and then carried back for convalescence. This was 
bad for the patient, inconvenient for the attendants and very much 
hampered the usefulness of the Institution. 

In June, 1917, the demand became so great that a drive for 
funds was begun and about $22,000 subscribed and collected. This 
sum was so inadequate for the purpose, and the people of the 
country being at that time harassed by war troubles, and assailed 
on all sides for contributions for various purposes, that the matter 
lay dormant for a few months. Then a public-spirited member of 



the Rite, in the person of Albert Steiner, came to the rescue and 
donated $25,000 toward the building fund. The Scottish Rite Body 
supplemented this with $20,000, and finally subscribed $20,000 ad- 
ditional, making $40,000 in all. From other sources about $15,000 
was received, and despite the high cost of material and labor, in 
June, 1918, the Board of Governors determined to start the erec- 
tion of the new building. Plans were drawn by a competent archi- 
tect, who personally visited, at his own expense, institutions of 
similar nature in the North, and finally, on the first of August, 
1919, the new structure was thrown open for occupancy. 

The cost of the present building and equipment was about 
$130,000, and there is still a debt upon it of $30,000. This is 
being carried by local banks, and it is desired to liquidate it during 
the current year. 

It is not too much to say that it is a model Institution, com- 
plete in every part, with operating room, dental room, X-ray appa- 
ratus, sterilizing outfit, and everything to make a complete unit 
within itself. 

The new structures are located on the original site, about six 
acres having been purchased for the purpose. 

The Staff has been selected with the utmost care, and is 
headed by Dr. Michael Hoke, a surgeon of international reputation, 
and the operations already performed savor of the miraculous. 
Every form of disease coming under the general terms of ortho- 
paedics, including spinal curvature, club foot, tuberculosis of the 
bones and joints and all of the many ailments resulting from 
infantile paralysis and similar diseases are treated. 

The present capacity is fifty-six beds. The cost of main- 
tenance, in round figures, is about $500 per bed per annum. This is 
to be met by subscriptions from the brethren, by donations from 
outside interests, and its last and final deficit must be made up by 
the Scottish Rite Bodies. 

The Hospital work is supplemented by a clinic which is op- 
erated largely for the benefit of local patients. This is one of the 
most important branches of the Hospital work. 

During the first year sixty-two patients were received into the 
Hospital and one hundred and seventy-six into the clinic. Of 
these, twenty-seven were cured in the Hospital and fifty-two in the 
clinic, the others, of course, being still under treatment at the end 
of the year and being reported in the new year's work. 



During the second year one hundred and fifty-seven children 
were received into the Hospital and two hundred and thirty-one 
into the clinic. Of these, sixty-one were discharged cured from 
the Hospital, and one hundred and twenty-seven from the clinic. 
During the year the number of operations performed by the Med- 
ical Staff was two hundred and twenty-five. 

During the third year one hundred patients were entered in 
the Hospital and one hundred and thirty-seven in the clinic. Of 
these, fifty-seven were discharged from the Hospital cured and 
twenty-eight from the clinic. During the year they performed 
one hundred and ninety operations. 

During the fourth year one hundred and thirty-two children 
entered the Hospital and two hundred and fifty-six were treated 
in the clinic. Of these, eighty-four were discharged from the Hos- 
pital and one hundred and four from the clinic. The operations 
this year totaled two hundred and fifty-five. 

Of course, the figures given above, as to admissions, both in 
the Hospital and clinic, refer entirely to new entries and not to re- 
entries of children brought back for second treatments. 

This, in brief, is a report of the Institution to date. The 
pictures shown herein speak for themselves. 

Charities of this kind appeal to every class of citizens. It 
appeals to the business man because it prevents possible burdens 
upon the body politic; it appeals to the lover of his race because a 
helpless little child, dependent upon charity, and possibly without 
hope of benefit, touches every heart-string; it appeals to Masons 
because it is a constructive charity, and Masonry stands pre- 
eminently for building up ; and it must appeal to the Scottish Rite 
Masons of Atlanta, because it is fostered by them, and they were 
the first to put into visible form an unselfish love for humanity. 



Governing Board 



Thos. K. Glenn 
President 

Forrest Adair 

Vice-President 

J. C. Greenfield 
Treasurer 

Mrs. C. W. Wardlaw 
Secretary 

David Marx 
Henry C. Heinz 
Mrs. Edgar Neely 
Mrs. W. T. Perkinson 



Staff 



ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY 
Dr. Michael Hoke Dr. O. L. Miller 

Dr. L. Thornton 

EAR, EYE, NOSE AND THROAT 
Dr. W. E. Campbell Dr. F. P. Calhoun 

Dr. Newton Craig Dr. A. G. Fort 

GENERAL SURGERY 
Dr. F. W. McRae Dr. F. K. Boland 

NEURO-SURGERY 
Du. C. E. Dowman 

DISEASES OF CHILDREN 
Dr. R. G. McAliley Dr. L. B. Clark 

Dr. W. E. Ragan 

NEUROLOGISTS 
Dr. L. M. Gaines Dr. E. B. Block 

GENITO-URINARY DISEASES 
Dr. W. L. Champion Dr. M. L. Boyd 

PATHOLOGIST 
Dr. A. H. Bunce 

DENTISTS 

Dr. M. E. Turner Dr. S. L. Silverman 

Dr. T. P. Hinman Dr. L. M. White 
Dr. C. N. Hughes 

RADIOLOGIST 
Mr. Barnes Sale 

PHYSICAL THERAPEUTICS 
Miss Elizabeth Dunican, Director Miss Lois Wright 

ANAESTHETIST 
Miss Hortense Marion 



SUPERINTENDENT 
Miss Lillian Carter 




The improvement in W. J. Jackson was accomplished in twelve months. 
(See opposite photograph.) 




Little Ralph's feet were straightened in thirteen weeks. 
(See opposite photograph.) 




it required four months to place Preston's feet flat on the ground. 
(See opposite photograph.) 




It required seven months to straighten Claude's feet. 
(See opposite photograph.) 




Six months was necessary to correct the trouble with Clarence. 
(See opposite photograph.) 




Little John's troubles were over after five months. 
(See opposite photograph.) 




Nine months was necessary for Theodus. 
(See opposite photograph.) 



Louise's right leg was straightened and her feet brought flat to the ground 

in ten weeks. 
(See opposite photograph.) 




but her foot was straightened in ten months. 
(See opposite photograph.) 




The improvement in William was accomplished in thirteen weeks. 
(See opposite photograph.) 




We had Ralph for four months. 
(See opposite photograph.) 



The change in Joseph was brought about in four months. Especial attention 
is called to the improveni3nt in facial expression. 
(See opposite photograph.) 



Notice the difference in Brittain's expression after being enabled to stand erect 

for the first time. 

(See opposite photograph.) 




The change in Lawrence required only six months. 
(See opposite photograph.) 




* • 4 > 



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